ARUGULA AND FRESH CHICKPEA SALAD

Recently I ran across fresh chickpeas at Central Market and the farmers market.  If you’ve never had them before, I encourage you to give them a try.

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Each cute little pod holds one or two chickpeas.

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Don’t let those fuzzy little pods fool you, though — these things are a pain in the neck to shell, although they’re worth the effort.  The pods don’t pop open very easily, and they’re surprisingly tough.  I suggest starting with a small quantity, perhaps 1/3 pound, which should yield enough for this salad (plus, they tend to be kinda pricey).

Chickpeas, also known as garbanzos in Spain and Latin American countries, are a member of the pea family.  I was disappointed to learn that they are not called chickpeas because they look like fat little chicks.  I can’t be the only one that thought this, can I?  I mean, it’s not that big a stretch, is it?

 

In fact, the name chickpea comes from the French chiche, which comes from the Latin cicer arietinum, meaning “small ram,” which, according to one source reflects “the unique shape of this legume that somewhat resembles a ram’s head.”  If you say so.  Oh well, yet another step closer to being Cliff Clavin.

I tried roasting fresh chickpeas a few years ago when they first started appearing in stores, based on raves in the blogosphere.  I didn’t think the final product was significantly better than if I had used canned chickpeas, and it was definitely not worth the extra time involved, in my opinion.  But blanching them until they are tender is a different story.  The chickpeas turn a bright green, and they taste very much like fava beans with a firmer texture.  Plus, they’re so chirpin’ cute.

So after shelling my pound of fresh chick peas for what seemed like a very long time, I blanched them and used them in this pleasing salad.  The combination of arugula, pea shoots, chickpeas, and parmesan is just different enough to be interesting.  I used a slightly sweet vinaigrette, but I think it would also be nice with a creamy herbed dressing or even ranch dressing.  All amounts given are approximate.

ARUGULA AND FRESH CHICKPEA SALAD
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Recipe type: Salad, Vegetarian
Author:
Ingredients
  • For the salad:
  • 6-8 cups baby arugula
  • ⅓ pound fresh chickpeas
  • 1 cup fresh pea shoots
  • 1 ounce Parmesan cheese
  • For the dressing:
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon honey
  • Salt and pepper to taste
Instructions
  1. Bring a small pot of salted water to a boil, and add chickpeas. Boil for 3 to 5 minutes, until tender. Drain and rinse with cool water to stop cooking. When cool enough to handle, shell chickpeas.
  2. Meanwhile, prepare vinaigrette by whisking together oil, vinegars, and honey in a small bowl. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
  3. Place arugula, pea shoots, and chickpeas in a large salad bowl. Just before serving, drizzle with vinaigrette, reserving any extra for another use. Using a vegetable peeler, shave long strips of Parmesan cheese on top of salad, and serve.

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Blanched fresh chickpeas

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Waiting to get dressed

POMODORO BASILICO SALAD

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I found this 1940s produce crate label for Dominator Tomatoes, used by the T.O. Tomasello Company of Watsonville, California, on ebay.  It features a U.S. fighter plane.  I got it along with several other labels featuring airplanes, thinking it would be cute to frame them for my then-young son’s airplane-themed room.

I never did get around to framing those labels.  Never finished collecting all of the state quarters with him either, but somehow we’ve managed to carry on.

This time of year, tomatoes do indeed dominate.  The tomato season in Houston is short, and the tomatoes are not pretty, but they taste great.  These heirloom tomatoes from the farmers market a few weeks ago were wonderful with sliced red onions and kirby cucumbers, drizzled with a little olive oil and red wine vinegar.

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Although the Houston tomato season is pretty much over, we’re enjoying vine-ripened tomatoes from other parts of the U.S.  My research indicates that Florida is the largest producer of fresh market tomatoes, whereas California produces almost all of the tomatoes processed in the U.S.  The USDA says that we eat between 22-24 pounds of tomatoes per person annually, with more than half of those tomatoes used in ketchup and tomato sauce.  And according to one survey, 93% of U.S. gardening households grow tomatoes.

The scientific name for tomatoes is lycopersicum (technically, either lycopersicon lycopersicum or solanum lycopersicum, depending on who you think is correct — oh, the controversies that arise in the plant-naming world!), which means “wolf peach,” and has its origins in German werewolf myths.  According to legend, the nightshade plant (tomatoes are in the nightshade family) was used in potions by witches and sorcerers to change themselves into werewolves.  When the similar, but larger tomato arrived in Europe, it was called “wolf peach.”

Tomatoes are believed to have originated in the Andes.  The word tomato comes from the Aztec “xitomate,” which means “plump thing with a navel.”  So the next time your loved one refers to you as a hot tomato, don’t be so flattered.

Botanically speaking, a tomato is a fruit.  For culinary purposes, which, let’s face it, are far more important than botanical purposes, a tomato is considered a vegetable.  As I told my son, when he was studying for his theology final and trying to explain the difference between knowledge and wisdom:

Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; 

Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad
Well, they may not be great in fruit salad, but tomatoes — especially ripe summer tomatoes — are wonderful in vegetable salads.  Inspired by the Dominator tomato crate label, this recipe for Pomodoro Basilico Salad makes great use of the season’s fresh tomatoes, and really allows the tomato to be the star of this salad.  For the very best results, use a good quality olive oil and balsamic vinegar.

POMODORO BASILICO SALAD
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Recipe type: Salad, Vegetable, Vegetarian
Author:
Ingredients
  • 1 pint grape tomatoes, halved
  • 12 calamata olives, sliced
  • 6 large basil leaves, thinly sliced into ribbons
  • ½ of a small red onion, thinly sliced
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • ¼ cup grated Parmesan cheese
Instructions
  1. Place tomatoes, olives, basil, and onion in a medium bowl. In a small bowl, whisk together oil and vinegars, and pour over tomato mixture. Stir gently to combine. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Just before serving, sprinkle with Parmesan cheese.

 

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You say to-may-to, I say delicious